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Europe Politics

Bulgaria: Can Civil Unrest Lead to Actual Change?

Protests in Bulgaria have been taking place for almost three consecutive months now. However, not much has been said in terms of whether this increasing civil unrest will lead to actual change within the state.

Africa Security

Libya – The Impacts of the Ceasefire on Libyan Politics

On 21 August 2020, the UN-backed Government of National Accord (GNA) based in Tripoli and its rival administration controlling Eastern Libya announced their commitment to a ceasefire and to finding a political solution to the conflict that has ravaged the country since 2011. So far, the truce has been successful in preventing further violence. However, it has opened the door to political infighting within both parties which could compromise the overall inter-Libyan dialogue. 

International Politics

Populism, Leadership and Broken Campaign Pledges

Despite their struggle against the spread of the virus, populist leaders should not necessarily be counted out by their opponents. Their failings in the face of COVID-19 means their political opponents should regard them with greater attention than before, as the ensuring political landscape is one easily taken advantage of by populist rhetoric. 

Eurasia Politics

Russia’s East is Fed Up

Fresh from a national referendum allowing for the continuation of President Vladimir Putin’s rule, Moscow capitalized on the renewed political mandate by arresting a troublesome regional governor. What followed next was a near unprecedented backlash from the inhabitants of the Khabarovsk region in Russia’s East, with 20-60,000 initial protestors getting involved in the single longest-running protest in the history of the Russian Federation. These protests represent the latest displays of a long-standing resentment of Moscow’s meddling in the east of the country, while also serving as an indictment of the failings of Russian federalism.

Europe Security

Nagorno Karabakh – The Conflict in Perspective

The Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is often wrongfully seen as another post-Soviet frozen conflict in both academia and in policy-making circles. Although the conflict is indeed a product of specific preconditions and deliberate Soviet policies, it differs from other protracted ethno-political conflicts like in Georgia or Moldova. Gaining a deeper understanding of how this conflict came about, and its underlying causes, is essential for understanding the current episode of fighting between Armenia and Azerbaijan. 

Latin America Politics

As Iván Duque completes two years as President, Colombia faces a new wave of protests

Like many other Latin American countries, Colombia’s domestic stability depends on a wide variety of factors and one event can trigger a significant wave of social unrest. We saw this for instance in Brazil in 2013 and 2014 and in Chile in 2019, when both President Dilma Rousseff and President Sebastián Piñera, respectively, raised bus and train fares, sparking protests all over the country. These small events are catalysts of something much bigger. After the killing of a civilian by police officers, demonstrations are once again erupting all over the country and do not seem to be solely focused on police brutality. 

Covid-19 Europe

Sweden Might Avoid a Second Wave, But at What Cost?

Sweden has taken a notably lax approach to dealing with Coronavirus, avoiding lockdowns and trying to act as if all were normal. However, this apparent indifference to the worldwide pandemic has born costs to Sweden’s international reputation, and the economic benefits appear somewhat smaller than hoped.

Latin America Security

Argentina: A Second Falklands Brewing?

The Falklands are once more set to be the centre of a dispute between Argentina and the United Kingdom if Argentina does not recover from its economic woes. Fears of possible new tensions rise with a president that is seeking to divert attention  and use the Falklands to refocus the Argentine mindset.

Asia Pacific Economics

‘Suganomics’: What can we expect?

Japan’s new Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, who took up office on 16th September, faces the challenge of revitalizing an economy still reeling from the effects of COVID-19. There are indications that Suga will continue many elements of his predecessor Shinzo Abe’s ‘Abenomics’ policy. Nevertheless, his economic policies are likely to diverge from Abe’s in a few key areas, owing to the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic and Suga’s tenure as Minister for Internal Affairs and Communications.

Debate Corner Europe Security

Cuts in the European Defence Fund’s budget: at what cost?

The European Defence Fund (EDF) was originally intended as a key measure for achieving European strategic autonomy. Its downsizing is putting future EU military and industrial capabilities into question, while highlighting the permanent lack of defence cooperation between EU member states.